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ARCHIVE ACCESS INFO

AP = Artist Proof
PP = Printers Proof
Blemished = Minor dinged corners, creases, stains

Regular price $75.00

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Edition

Only 1 in stock

Important

Each of our ARTivism print editions is meticulously hand-crafted. Please allow up to 10 weeks for order delivery. Thank you for your patience.

Bioluma by Craig Drake

Standard (Teal): Edition of 50 signed & numbered
3-Color Screen Print on 100lb Cougar Cover featuring glow-in-the-dark inks

Variant (Pink): Edition of 20 (signed & numbered)
3-Color Screen Print on 100lb Cougar Fine Art Paper

Oversized print at 24" x 36"

Printed by Seizure Palace Screen Printing

Artist Statement

The jellyfish is my favorite deep sea creature because it is enigmatic and utterly magnificent.  The bioluminescence and seemingly alien form compelled me to interpret an illustration that captured its eerie beauty.  Its home environment feels akin to the deep reaches of space, which inspired me to create a composition as if it were an alien in a science fiction poster. 

About The Artist

Craig Drake, originally from Detroit, moved to San Francisco in 1998 to work in animation and freelance design, later moving on to Electronic Arts. He started working for Lucasfilm in 2006 where he created his first Patrick Nagel parody image (a limited edition Princess Leia print). Since then, he has become known for Nagel-izing pop culture figures masterfully, bringing a sleek 80′s aesthetic to everyone in his path.

About the Deep Sea

The deep sea includes the deepest, darkest, coldest parts of the ocean which are under the greatest amounts of atmospheric pressure. Eighty percent of the ocean consists of waters greater than 1,000 meters in depth. Parts of the deep sea are also included in the pelagic zone, but these areas in the deepest reaches of the ocean have their own special characteristics. Most areas are cold, dark, and inhospitable to humans, but support a surprising number of species that thrive in this intense environment. In the parts of the deep sea where light can not penetrate, there are fish and other animals like giant squid. Because there is no sunlight, there are no algae to start food chains. Instead many animals living in the deep sea rely on the bodies of dead animals falling from the water above for food. There are two extreme environments in the deep sea where life is more abundant. These are cold seeps and hydrothermal vents. In these environments, food chains do not begin with plants or algae that make food from sunlight.

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